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FROM OUR EDITORS—October 9, 2022 – 28th Sunday in Ordinary Time

FROM OUR EDITORS—October 9, 2022 – 28th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Para la versión en español, haga clic aquí.

The Catholic Church traditionally dedicates the month of October to the Holy Rosary. During the Middle Ages, Saint Dominic, through the inspiration of Our Blessed Mother Mary, was the first to preach and teach the Rosary as a form of meditative prayer. Our Lady appeared to Saint Dominic along with three angels and told him that the best weapon for the conversion of souls was to pray her Psalter. At the end of the fifteenth century, the Dominican Order gave the Rosary a structure similar to the one we have today. During this month, Catholics also celebrate the Feast of Our Lady of the Rosary on October 7.

Throughout history, innumerable testimonies of conversions of those who did not believe in God have been recorded worldwide thanks to the praying of the Rosary. The Rosary is a true source of grace. God wants us to receive many blessings through the intercession of the Virgin Mary; after all, it was through her that we receive salvation.

Queen of the most holy Rosary, pray for us. Amen.

Every week in the GROW newsletter, you will find helpful tips for teaching your Gospel Weeklies lesson, a reflection on the Sunday Gospel, and links to online resources.

Videos of Sunday’s Gospel
Use these videos as you discuss today’s Gospel. Please preview all videos you plan to share with your class:
     Sunday Gospel Cartoon Reading and Lesson
     Holy Heroes
     Gospel Reading and Reflection for Kids

Seeds
Lesson Theme: Jesus is our friend.
For this lesson, you will need crayons, scissors, tape, a stapler, 9″ X 12″ envelopes, story coloring page (one per child), a Church Year calendar, and aide(s) to help with the cutting and folding activity.

This Sunday’s Gospel talks about Jesus healing ten lepers. Simply explain to the children that leprosy (Hansen’s disease) is a skin disease that people in Jesus’ time were very afraid of catching. To protect their families and friends from catching leprosy, people who had this disease lived outside of the towns with other lepers. Help the children identify occasions when they are included and for which they can respond with thanksgiving, as one of the lepers did.

Teaching Guide
Parent Teaching Pages
Lesson Planning Ideas for Grandparents
Extending Activities
The Gospel at Home
Weekly Review Template
Word of the Week
Seasonal Resources
Videos
     Gospel Reflection and Saint of the Week
     Bible Bag Gospel Lesson with Mrs. Cole

Promise
Lesson Theme: We can thank God.
For this lesson, you will need scissors, tape, drawing paper, crayons, “Thank you, Jesus!” bracelet strips, a Bible, a Church Year calendar, and aide(s) to help with cutting, folding, and taping. We suggest that you separate pages 1–2 from 3–4 and make the “Thank you, Jesus!” bracelet strips (see page TG1-19) in advance.

In Sunday’s Gospel, Jesus heals ten lepers. Simply explain to the children that leprosy (Hansen’s disease) is a skin disease that people in Jesus’ time were very afraid of catching. To protect their families and friends from catching leprosy, people who had this disease lived outside of the towns with other lepers. You might also wish to explain a bit about the relationship of Jewish people to people from Samaria. Jewish people in Jesus’ time looked down on and stayed away from people from Samaria. After sharing the Gospel, point out that it was a man from Samaria who came back to thank Jesus for healing him. Jesus’ followers would have been surprised that it was a man from Samaria who came back to thank Jesus.

Teaching Guide
Parent Teaching Pages
Lesson Planning Ideas for Grandparents
Extending Activities
The Gospel at Home
Weekly Review Template
Online Assessment
Word of the Week
Seasonal Resources
Videos
     Gospel Reflection and Saint of the Week
     Bible Bag Gospel Lesson with Mrs. Cole

Good News
Lesson Theme: Jesus cares for and heals us.
For this lesson, gather scissors, game markers, crayons, dice, pencils, drawing paper, and a Church Year calendar. Plan ahead for a church visit.

This lesson introduces the children to sacraments as signs of Jesus’ love. Although they may still be concrete thinkers, Good News children can grasp the concept of signs. They recognize a hug as a way to show forgiveness, a meal as a gift of nourishment, a handshake as a promise of faithfulness. The Sunday Gospel about Jesus healing ten lepers will help the children connect Jesus’ action of healing to the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick. The lesson plan suggests that you name all Seven Sacraments and invite the children to explore how Jesus shows his love for us in each one. Find these answers on page TG1-19.

Teaching Guide
Parent Teaching Pages
Lesson Planning Ideas for Grandparents
The Gospel at Home
Weekly Review Template
Online Assessment
Seasonal Resources
Video
     The Seven Sacraments

Venture
Lesson Theme: Jesus helps those in need.
We continue the Gospel theme of outsiders this Sunday. Remind the young people that Jesus doesn’t repeat himself by accident—it’s because the message is especially important, and he wants to make sure we are paying attention. Encourage the children to complete the cover activity first without any help. Then, if necessary, distribute the What the Church Believes and Teaches handbooks and direct them to refer to the page numbers after each clue. Make sure to have answers available for the About My Diocese section on page 5. You will need to know your diocese/archdiocese, your bishop or archbishop’s name, and the name of your cathedral church.

Teaching Guide
Parent Teaching Pages
Lesson Planning Ideas for Grandparents
The Gospel at Home
Weekly Review Template
Online Assessment
Seasonal Resources
Videos
     Digital Story: Bartolome de las Casas
     Rome Reports: Pope Francis ordains Benedict XVI’s former secretary and two nuncios as bishop
     Why does the bishop wear all that stuff?
     Biography of Saint Kateri Tekakwitha, the First Native American Saint

Visions
Lesson Theme: God’s love is for all.
We continue the theme of outsiders this Sunday. Remind the young people that Jesus doesn’t repeat themes by accident. Ask them to reflect about the questions on the cover: Who is an outsider in their midst? When do they feel as though they have been outsiders? How does Jesus treat outsiders? Make sure to spend as much time with the story-comic as you would with another story or article.

This lesson is an introduction to the forms of prayer. Students will have varying levels of familiarity with prayer forms. Encourage advanced students to deepen their prayer practice and understanding. Then introduce the young people to newly canonized saint Cardinal John Henry Newman. His motto—“heart speaks to heart”—is a good way to explain how we pray with God.

Teaching Guide
Parent Teaching Pages
Lesson Planning Ideas for Grandparents
The Gospel at Home
Weekly Review Template
Online Assessment
Seasonal Resources
Videos
     Rome Reports: Pope Francis ordains Benedict XVI’s former secretary and two nuncios as bishop
     Why does the bishop wear all that stuff?
     The Lectio Divina Steps
     John Henry Newman, Saint

Image credit: Corinne SIMON/CIRIC

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Our Editors


David Dziena
Publisher

David Dziena is the Publisher of Pflaum Publishing Group. He has also served as Executive Editor and […]

Nicholle Check
Senior Editor

Nicholle Check, senior editor, joined Pflaum Publishing Group in 2014. Throughout her 25-year career in publishing […]

Joan McKamey
Project Editor

Joan McKamey, project editor, joined the Gospel Weeklies editorial team in September 2016. […]

Erika De Urquidi
Bilingual Editor

Erika De Urquidi, bilingual editor, joined Bayard, Inc. in July 2018. During her 15 years as a professional translator […]